Matt Eakle Flutist for Hire

Matt Eakle  is a flutist for hire who brings his distinctive sound, and fluency in a wide spectrum of styles, to films, commercials, live shows, private events, bands and orchestras.

Matt Eakle’s versatile flute has given voice to the wind in cartoons, expanded the boundaries of progressive bluegrass as the world’s first bluegrass wind player (David Grisman Quintet), and added soulful solos to live classical, jazz, rock, bluegrass and reggae performances. Contact Matt to add his signature sound on flute, penny whistle, piccolo, bass flute or alto flute to your ensemble.

Matt will bring the same degree of artistic integrity to your project that Bonnie Raitt, Linda Ronstadt, Chris Isaak, David Grisman, Jerry Garcia, conductor Michael Tilson Thomas and New Age pioneer, Suzanne Ciani, have come to expect on theirs.

Enhance your sound by adding Matt Eakle’s reading of written arrangements, and/or improvised flute work to your recording project, film or commercial soundtrack, ensemble, or concert. His distinct and unique voice will set your work apart.

Composer: Matt composes music for films and accepts commissions for special events.

Contractor and Bandleader: Matt assembles, rehearses and performs with his brilliant musician friends in classical, jazz and ethnic fusion duos, trios, quartets and larger groups, including his flute-fired piano, bass and drums ensemble, the Matt Eakle Band.

Musical Director of Centerpiece Theatrical Imagery and Music Experiences: Matt works in a collaborative team with composer/sound designer Christopher Hedge, as Musical Director of C-TIME, Centerpiece Theatrical Imagery and Music Experiences. Christopher Hedge was sound engineer for Paul Horn, the flutist whose iconic recording, Inside the Taj Mahal and Inside the Great Pyramid, gave birth to New Age music. At C-TIME, we combine surround-sound speakers, live musicians, and lighting/projected imagery to translate the energy of the moment into a musical performance, breaking down the barriers between performers and audience.

Jack is Back”

Finally, a word from Matt, aka: ¡FLUTOR!

Does anyone dare risk personal dignity and the integrity of their reputation by weighing in on the biggest, oldest, hottest controversy in the flute world?  ¡FLUTOR! says, Yes!

Every English speaking flute player who’s ever touched the sacred pipe to their lips has faced the inquiry, “Do you call yourself a flautist, flutist, or flute player?”

Classical audiences think flautist is the correct term, yet I’ve never known a classical flute player to refer to him or herself as a classical flautist, but rather as a classical flutist or classical flute player. I’ve heard a couple jazz flute players refer to themselves as jazz flautists, but usually it’s audiences and critics who use jazz flautist, while jazz flute players tend to prefer the appellation, jazz flutist. Me? I call myself a jazz flutist, classical flutist, or ¡FLUTOR! and leave it at that.